#EDSBlogChallenge (Part 2)

Chronic Illnesses, Invisible illnesses, Uncategorized

Hi Guys,

If you are just tuning in and missed my initial post or want to get involved in the challenge you can still find the questions on my first  #EDSBlogChallenge post.


  1. What are your top 5 coping tips?
  • Stay hydrated with water
  • Eat small but frequent meals
  • Take naps or rest when possible
  • Be honest with other people about your limits
  • Use natural remedies like lavender and mint to help with physical pain

  1. What are your top 5 goals you want to accomplish despite your chronic illness(es)?
  • Complete my placement year in Marketing
  • Finish my degree with a 2:1 minimum
  • Travel to two countries in the next two years
  • Keep blogging as a hobby
  • Spend more time with my friends and boyfriend making special memories

  1. How do you stay motivated in your daily life?
  • I try to keep my mind occupied on University work
  • Reading books when I can focus
  • Writing whilst watching films or listening to music
  • Giving my pet rabbit and my boyfriend’s dog cuddles
  • Talking to friends and using Facebook support groups for Ehlers-Danlos
  • Asking support from people when I am having bad flares

  1. What do you want people to know the most about your life with EDS?
  • It isn’t just a joint problem that makes me look young, it is a joint problem that affects my daily life in most things I do.
  • The chronic fatigue part of it is insane and pain in one area may be different and a different severity to another part another day.

  1. When did you first start thing that the dislocations/subluxation extreme flexibility etc. could be related to a real problem?
  • Around 22-23 years old when I stopped working as a Waitress I noticed the pain heightened considerably and I became very weak.

  1. Did your related diagnoses come before or after your EDS diagnosis?
  • Photosensitivity, IBS, nut, gluten and lactose allergies, oral food syndrome and a vitamin D insufficiency came before and chronic bladder syndrome, an increase in mast cells came after.
  • My pots test came back inconclusive and I am waiting to be tested for MCAD, Chrones and celiac disease

  1. What is your biggest pet peeve about trying to explain EDS?
  • Many people think I am lucky when I explain that I am hyper-mobile and switch off when I try to explain it is much more than that.

  1. How has being sick impacted your relationships?
  • Some relationships have become stronger and some weaker. I am shyer to make new friends and talk to new people as I am worried I won’t be able to sustain new friendships.
  • I have found a boyfriend who accepts me for who I am and understands I can’t do everything and I have become closer with my family.

  1. What was your initial thoughts about being diagnosed?
  • I was such a mix bag of emotions!
  • I was happy to find out I had EDS but I thought that was the end of it. I realised it was just the start of a long journey to find out what else was lurking behind the wood works having very big digestive and bladder problems.
  • However, I am happy the doctors are more willing to find out what is wrong and try to make me feel better

  1. What healthy habits have you adopted since being diagnosed?
  • To be honest this is still a massive work in progress. I still smoke and drink alcohol but I have cut down considerably (more on the alcohol part).
  • Any form of exercise hurts and tires me out massively but I am going to try and start a full-time job for a placement in July
  • I am eating healthier eating more fruit and vegetables and making sure get lots of rest.

  1. How do you feel about your current treatment plan?
  • My current treatment plan isn’t very good as I am back taking Tramadol and a few other tablets and strong vitamins.
  • I was meant to do the 3 week intensive therapy course at RNOH but I currently am struggling to stay up 9-5 to do this.
  • I am also waiting for planning instillations and I am having an Endoscopy soon. I feel once I see a mast cell specialist the EDS will get better if I can block out some flares.

  1. What do you think is the most misunderstood aspect of EDS?
  • That it is even an illness(to those who don’t know what EDS initially is)
  • for those who do I find they think all the types are the same and even people with the same types have the same issues

  1. What are your top things to pass time when you’re stuck in bed?
  • Eat and sleep!
  • Watch Netflix
  • Text or speak to friends on the phone
  • Blog or do Uni work
  • Smother (I mean cuddle) my boyfriend

  1. What is your favourite motivational quote and why?
  • It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you don’t not stop.
  • I love this quote because it shows that resistance is key and no matter how long something takes if your determined you will get there in the end

 Sharing is Caring

Please help me in my quest of raising awareness of EDS by sharing this post


Have your Say 

Do you have EDS or know anyone with it with similar or different experiences – then why not comment below?


Like what you see?

Join me on my journey

Facebook page

WordPress

Twitter 

Instagram

Pinterest

Thanks for Reading

Lots of Love,

my name

#EDSAwarenessMonth Blog Challenge

Chronic Illnesses, Invisible illnesses

 

zeb

Hey Guys,

As the sun is shining it is clear summer has started … but for those of you who don’t know  May is also Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Awareness Month.  As University is winding down for the year I am hoping to get back in the swing of blogging.

I found the #EDSAwarenessMonth Blog Challenge by Kali at  This Spoonie Speaks. I have decided to participate but please bare with me as I catch up… To begin I will answer the first six questions but if any of you fellow Zebras want to participate in the challenge, I have listed the questions at the end of this post.

my name


1.Introduce yourself and explain what type of EDS you have.

I am Morgan, quarter of a century old in my second year studying BA (Hons) Business and Management at Oxford Brookes.  From my knowledge there are 13 types of recognised EDS, but I have the most common type which is type III known as hEDS. I was diagnosed with EDS at 23 years old by a rheumatologist but I had showed signs from an early age.

One of reasons why I was not diagnosed earlier is because hEDS does not have a specific blood tests and symptoms can vary between patients.  However, there are more stringent guidelines for diagnosing EDS now, known as the Beighton Score.

You don’t need to wait to see a doctor to see if you can do the 9 tasks you will be asked to perform when seeking an official diagnosis.  I don’t remember my Beighton score but I remember it being relatively high with more flexibility in my upper body ( you don’t need to be able to pass all 9). My lower body has become more flexible over the last two years.However, a common misconception is your only symptom is hEds is hyper-mobility.  My other main symptoms of EDS are joint pain,  bladder and bowl pain, chronic fatigue, bruising, problems absorbing vitamins and severe photo sensitivity.


2. What other illnesses do you have that are related to your EDS?

It is common for EDS to coexist with other conditions, however this is not always the case.  Unfortunately, for me this is not clear cut.

I suffer with multiple allergies and gastroenterology issues which are still under investigation. I was born lactose intolerant and then developed allergies to gluten, nuts, tree pollen, grass pollen cats and nickel being sensitive to numerous other products and being diagnosed with oral food syndrome and IBS.

I am suspected to have Crones or Celiac Disease but have not been able to intake gluten for 6 weeks to be tested. I have also been waiting over a year to see a mast cell specialist and bladder instillation’s due to chronic bladder syndrome.  When I was younger I suffered a lot with urine and bacteria infections associated with eating certain foods. My POTS test came back inconclusive but I I an renown for  low blood pressure.


3.How long did it take you to get your diagnosis? How many doctors did you see?

After my brother suspected I had EDS it took me about a year to get an official diagnosis. However, my parents paid for me to go privately as my GP was convinced it was all in my head despite my brothers diagnosis and similar symptoms for years. Initially I saw a Rheumatologist but due to  the time of my diagnosis and the changes in EDS regulation I saw another one on the NHS to confirm I did  have EDS.


4. What do you want newly diagnosed EDS-ers to know?

Its okay to feel relieved when you receive a diagnosis but also overwhelmed.  The difference is know you have the resources and language to help you start recovery when you are ready. However, do not expect a diagnosis to be a quick fix, the NHS has long waiting lists and you may find a EDS diagnosis is the start of your journey to rule out other conditions.

Although it may not feel like it a label can help you out in so many ways. It can make your GP more understanding, support you apply for mitigating circumstances in your studies and your employer is likely to let you take more short-breaks.  I would say don’t try and figure everything about EDS in one day because this can leave you panicked or frustrated. You can find a local support group, or if you have a busy life or feel unwell social media has many virtual ones online. I find because everyone experience of EDS is not always the same I prefer to listen to specialists, but I know this does not work for everyone

It is all about finding out what works for you!


5. How have you adapted to your diagnosis?

I am still coming to terms with my diagnosis because mental health plays a big part in a physical illness and stress makes joint pain worse for me.  The biggest change is now knowing I cannot keep up with everyone else and going out one day will make me tired for two.  My life is having really productive days and long periods of nothing.  I am trying to get into a routine to do a 3 week inpatient physical therapy rehabilitation course at RNOH I have started taking Tramadol, Codiene and co-codamol when the pain becomes unbearable again.I also consume loads fizzy drinks for bursts of energy – Although, I don’t recommend this.

Hot water is my best friend and I find I always have a hot water bottle to hand and take multiple showers a day because  heat helps loads.   I am soon to be go back to full-time work properly for the first time in years but I will keep you posted on this – As I am still spending loads of time in bed.


6. How has EDS changed your life for the better? 

I am not going to lie to you and say EDS has changed my life for the better overall but it does have some positives.

Firstly, it helped me become an EDS advocate and find this hobby of blogging, sharing my experiences to help others.  Secondly, EDS has brought my family and I closer together because now they understand I am not being a drama queen and I am actually in pain.  Although I have lost friends by staying inside I have found by being in pain all the time I now found I appreciate the special memories I make with my friends and boyfriend.


Sharing is Caring 

Please help me in my quest of raising awareness of EDS by sharing this post.


Have your Say 

Do you have EDS or know anyone with it with similar or different experiences – then why not comment below? 


Like what you see? 

Join me on my journey;

Facebook page

WordPress

Twitter 

Instagram

Pinterest


 #EDSAwarenessMonth Blog Challenge Questions 

  1. Introduce yourself and explain what type of EDS you have.
  2. What other illnesses do you have that are related to your EDS?
  3. How long did it take you to get your diagnosis? How many doctors did you see?
  4. What do you want newly diagnosed EDS-ers to know?
  5. How have you adapted to your diagnosis?
  6. How has EDS changed your life for the better?
  7. What are your top 5 coping tips?
  8. What are your top 5 goals that you want to accomplish despite your chronic illness(es)?
  9. How do you stay motivated in daily life?
  10. What do you want people to know the most about your life with EDS?
  11. When did you first start thinking that the dislocations/subluxation, extreme flexibility ect. could be related to a real problem?
  12. Did your related diagnoses come before or after your EDS diagnosis?
  13. What’s your biggest pet peeve about trying to explain EDS?
  14. Has being sick impacted your relationships?
  15. What were your initial thoughts about being diagnosed?
  16. What healthy habits have you adopted since getting diagnosed?
  17. How do you feel about your current treatment plan?
  18. What do you think is the most misunderstood aspect of EDS?
  19. What are your top things to pass time when you’re stuck in bed?
  20. What is your favorite motivational quote and why?
  21. What is your favorite piece of medical equipment that you own?
  22. What things have you learned from being chronically ill?
  23. What was your worst medical setback? How did you overcome it?
  24. What was your worst encounter with a doctor?
  25. What is the worst unwanted advice you’ve ever gotten?
  26. Have you found books that have helped you cope with being chronically ill?
  27. What would your coping advice be to friends or family of someone who’s chronically ill?
  28. What is the strangest question you’ve ever been asked about EDS?
  29. Do you think changes to your diet helped or contributed to your symptoms or the severity of them?
  30. What has been your biggest outlet to help deal with being sick?
  31. What are your favorite memories from EDS Awareness Month?

 

 

 

5 Common Myths and Facts about Physical Therapy: Ashley Smith

Chronic Illnesses, Guest Posts, Invisble Illnesses

Hi Guys,

I have been undergoing lots at  hospitals to do with Gastroenterology to update you on.I promise will be back soon writing once the University year is over!

However, today we are fortunate enough to have an informative guest post from Ashley Smith on physical therapy. So without further a do…

I will hand you over

Lots of Love,

my name


 

Most Common Myths And Facts About Physical Therapy

It is widely believed that physical therapy is the best medicine/ solution for treating any kind of a pain. Physical therapy does not have any negative side effects on your health in any way. Normally, most of us have experienced a physical therapy at some point in time. Mostly, we are recommended to a physical therapist in the case of an accidental injury or a surgery. Therefore, we believe that we can visit them only if and when our doctor prescribes it.

Any kind of a physical therapy effectively helps you in restoring the movement, increasing mobility and flexibility, and on the top of everything, it helps in relieving the pain caused by injuries and certain health conditions. Physical therapists are the experts in treating any sort of pain, including all injuries and most of the health conditions. There are various kinds of physical therapy treatments that effectively work on the specific or the affected areas of the body.

However, in spite of knowing most of the benefits of the physical therapy, many people have certain myths about it. Yes, you read that right.  People believe certain things about the physical therapy, which are not true. You will be happy to know these myths and facts, which are the actual eye-openers for many of us.


Myth: I Can Visit a Physical Therapist Only When I Am Recommended

Fact

According to American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), it is found that around 70% of the people believe that they can visit a physical therapist only if they have a referral from their doctors. But, the fact is you can visit a physical therapist even without a referral. Mostly, we all visit them only when we are recommended for an accidental injury or a surgery.

The good news is you can visit a physical therapist on your own, whenever you feel even a little twinge of pain in your back, shoulders or the neck. Moreover, it is to be noted that most of the athletes and sports people attend physical therapy sessions to improve their performance, increase strength, flexibility, and movement. Therefore, do not delay your visit and treat that little pain of yours right away.


Myth: You Can Take A Physical Therapy Treatment Only In Case Of Accidents And Injuries

Fact

As mentioned earlier, many of us must have visited a physical therapist only in the case of an injury or an accident. So, we are habituated to believing that we cannot visit them exceptionally in any other case, where we are not recommended.

The fact is that you can visit a physical therapist even if you are suffering from severe and frequent headaches, neck pain, shoulder pain, or a back pain. Patients with chronic pain have chronic connective tissue disorders and they tend to heal slower. Therefore, they need an extra care to help them progress at their tolerance to prevent setbacks and frustration. In such cases, the relevant physical therapy effectively helps the patient in relieving their chronic pain. It is essential that the patient should be given the most relevant and effective physical therapy to help them overcome their chronic pain and disorder.


Myth:Physical Therapy Comprises Only Exercises

Fact

A few people may believe that going to a physical therapist will only make you do some exercises. They may think that a physical therapist can only suggest doing exercises to treat the pain caused by musculoskeletal conditions.

But, the fact is physical therapy is much more than just performing exercises. It is true that a physical therapist uses a lot of exercises to help you restore the function and movement of the body. However, they also use a variety of techniques to help you relieve the pain. The concerned physical therapists closely work with you and examine your pain thoroughly. They determine the cause of the pain and prepare a treatment plan that uniquely meets your personal needs, along with treating the pain and injuries.


Myth: Any Healthcare Professional Can Offer Physical Therapy

Fact

A majority of the people know that physical therapy can be performed by a licensed physical therapist. Yet, a few of us still believe that it can be offered by any healthcare professional, which is not true. A licensed physical therapist only can perform physical therapy, which will be accurate and effective.

Today, you will find graduating physical therapists are doctors of physical therapy, attaining education of 6 to 7 years in the concerned universities. Lots of them go ahead to earn board certification in certain specific areas such as orthopaedics, sports, women’s health, neurology, or manual therapy. A licensed physical therapy assistant can perform physical therapy under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist or a doctor of physical therapy. Any healthcare professional, who does not have a license of a relevant physical therapy certification cannot offer physical therapy services. According to Peak Motion Physical Therapy, “Physical therapists should be highly trained in corrective exercises to guide healing and restore function.”


Myth: Insurance Plans Do Not Cover Physical Therapy

Fact

Most of the insurance plans cover physical therapy treatment. In fact, a majority of the insurance companies have a list of physical therapy providers in their network. So, it is advisable that you check with your insurance company if it offers a cover for a physical therapy treatment and if so, then inquire about the deductible amount and the relevant details. It is vital that you should know your financial liabilities before you begin your treatment.


Myth: Only A Surgery Can Heal My Pain Or Injury

Fact

In lots of the cases, physical therapy has proved to be very effective in treating injuries without having you to go under the knife. Physical therapy can effectively heal injuries and pain without needing a surgery in many cases. Physical therapists are the best people, who can accurately identify your pain and heal it effectively with the most relevant pain-relief therapies and rehab services. So, visit a physical therapist today itself if you are suffering from any such injury or a pain.

Thus, do not believe your myths and get your injuries and pain treated without further delay by a licensed physical therapist.


Sharing is Caring 

Please share to inform those suffering on these myths and facts to encourage physical therapy.


Have your Say

Have you experienced any myths discussed in this article or know of any other ones? – If so I would love to hear them below. 

 

The Spoon Theory Explained

Invisble Illnesses, Physical Illnesses, Resources

Hi Guys,

I was contacted by Victoria at Burning Nights, who has produced a valuable infographic about the Spoon theory.

Victoria is the founder of Burning Nights is a small U.K charity dedicates to helping those battling  Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS).  CPRS is a chronic condition where someone usually experience chronic pain in one limb.  We would love if you shared this post to raise awareness of the condition and the work that the charity does.

You may also find my post 5 Ways to have a Productive Day with a Chronic Illness useful to manage your time  inspired by the Spoon theory)

Lots of Love,

my name


5 Ways to have a Productive Day with a Chronic Illness

Chronic Illnesses, Invisble Illnesses, Mental Illnesses, Physical Illnesses, University life

“Having a productive day is very subjective; what is productive for one person is not for another”.

Some days, I find waking up, washing and eating productive. Others assess,  I am being productive when I  do University work.  What I have noticed though – is we all have tasks that need to be completed and this can send us into panic mode. The vicious cycle, of where to start and where to finish has a ripple effect – like a child who got denied candy at the fun fair.

 If you are someone sat there reading this with a chronic illness, I am sure you have an inkling of the cycle I am talking about. If you don’t well… I sit here, in envy.   What I am going to call the ‘ torrential storm cycle’ makes you question which direction to go in first.   Anxiety and stress are no strangers, crawling around your body, taking its toll , physically and mentally.  This post is designed to stop you in your tracks, so you aren’t continuously interrogating yourself about ability and self-worth.

“I spend 90% of my time in bed, but a chronic illness does not mean accomplishing your goals are not possible”.

Achieving those goals may just take comprise, planning and longer than you anticipated.


5 Ways to have a Productive Day with a Chronic Illness

1. Evaluate tasks ft. the spoon theory

If you haven’t heard of Christine Miserandino’s Spoon theory , it is a great place to start to help you have a productive day.  The theory in a nutshell, is that anyone who is chronically ill has 12 spoons each day (each one resembling energy) and spoons are exchanged for tasks.  The amount of spoons exchanged will depend on factors such as the length of the task and how strenuous. The point here, is spoon must be used wisely so you don’t burn out. By ordering tasks by importance you can identify what needs to be done on what day and start to put a plan in motion.

spoon-theory-e1510325926400.jpg

 In reality, you may find executing a plan is not always possible. However, the spoon theory gives you a general consensus of how much you can get done in a day.

You may find – once you start having a productive day you are at the opposite end of the spectrum. At Uni, I get told a theory is just that a theory. I am taught to challenge theorists view. So it may not be a surprise to hear I wasn’t a firm believer of the Spoon theory at first.  I was so productive one day I felt on top of the world. I couldn’t believe my eyes. I had completed an exam, handed in an assignment, found a job, booked a flight, travelled home from Uni and packed for a holiday and cuddled my little bunny.

Shortly, after this semester came to a close – I realised I used the reserve of spoons for months. I had to fly home 3 weeks early from working abroad, quit the job I found and was  behind in every subject at Uni. Barely, attending lectures and hospital appointments.  What I am trying to emphasise, is pushing yourself one day really can have a detrimental effect on your health.

“You need to work out what is realistic to get done in a day for YOU”.

 Which takes me to by next point…


 2. Break down tasks

 Breaking down tasks makes things more manageable.  Something,  I am training myself in like a disobedient dog. I am one of those people who seeks to think holistically to even do a task.  However, breaking down tasks can relieve stress, because you know you are achieving something – which has got to be better than nothing, right?

goal

I have found people have been more understanding about my illness when they can see that I am trying rather than wallowing in self-pity.  The amount you need to break-down a task will depend on its complexity. It may be a case of trial and error, but you know your body better than anyone in time you will have this down to a tee.

 If it’s something academic, you could try and break things down with titles and research areas and tie the ideas together later.  You may not get the best grades you are used to due to time constraints.  However, at least you will pass and can try and work harder when you are feeling a bit brighter on future work. If the task is practical, like cooking, you could do prep at a certain time and then cook later in the day.  Or if you’re a little bit cheeky – ask someone to help you to make the task manageable.


3. Follow your Body Clock

Most people would say, sort out your body clock first and foremost. It may work, but it is something I have been trying to do for over 10 years. My body just likes to be up during the night. The fatigue and pain is more manageable after I have digested by one meal per day.

“To have a productive day you must follow your natural body clock”.

You don’t want to set yourself up for failure by taking a U-turn and trying to achieve tasks when your energy levels and pain threshold is low.

body clock

“Remember you can always move tasks to another day as long as you’re motivated to accomplish them”.


4. Relax… just not too much

Whether you have a chronic illness or not, everyone should take time to wind down.  If you’re fortunate enough TAKE a bath, or go and visit someone who does! Watch a comedy, listen to music or sit in silence, do what works for YOU. I am not saying you are not going to wake up still feeling fatigued because you probably will BUT subconsciously your body and mind is still getting a valuable break and you get a hint of happiness.  I find relaxing whilst doing a task slowly usually gives me the right balance. However, this may not work for everyone.

“Just remember, don’t relax too much or you won’t get anything done”.

bath.jpg


5. Relieve stress with a pet

Patting pets are proven to having a calming effect on humans (Rodriguez, 2012), which may help you to think more clearly and be more productive! It is ideal if you own a pet and go and give them love when you are stressed and they are in a good mood. If your pet is moody, trust me try hugging your friends’ pet or the other four tips AND come back to this one later.  When my pets are hungry they treats me like food and it makes me feel rejected and has the opposite effect.  If you cannot keep an animal, I suggest you look out for the nearest dog on your walks or go visit an animal shelter. That way you can have your rare day out, killing two birds with one stone.

 


Thanks for visiting Brains & Bodies. I hope I have shed some positive vibes on how to have a productive day.


Sharing is Caring 

I would love if you shared this post to help others with chronic illnesses have a productive day – everyone deserves one! For some reason all my shares reset back 27 from 84 , but please keep sharing. 🙂


Have your Say

Do you have any tips how to have a productive day? – I would love to hear them below.


Like what you see?

Join me on social media;

Facebook page

Twitter 

Instagram

Pinterest

Over and out,

my name


References 

Rodriguez, T. (2017). Pets Help Us Achieve Goals and Reduce Stress.

Spoon theory (2017). The Spoon Theory written by and spoken by Christine Miserandino. [online] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jn5IBsm49Rk [Accessed 10 Nov. 2017].

 

5 Challenges Blogging with a Chronic Illness…

Chronic Illnesses, Invisble Illnesses, Mental Illnesses, Physical Illnesses

 with a sprinkle of advice.

Hello, there 🙂

22580266_694779720711953_8334593537802764288_n

If you haven’t read my other posts, welcome. It’s not a secret anymore I am a spoonie. I am Morgan Isabella Shaw, a 24 years old that suffers from Ehlers Danlos Sydrome. However, recently when I was procrastinating, I remembered I haven’t confessed how challenging it is to blog when you have a chronic illness.

I will admit I find multiple things an uphill battle. Cooking, washing myself, walking, relationships and blogging is no different. Actually, it doesn’t happen – unless I am blogging from bed. Even then, five minutes into starting a post I tend to experience a  flare up and struggle to finish writing it that day.  As, I throw my laptop down, I feel disappointed in myself I have not met the strict self-inflicted deadline.

If you land on my homepage you will notice I endeavour to publish one post week.

One post a week – is that it?

Many fire back at me with an eye roll or one raised eyebrow. This made realise how many people do not understand how many challenges are behind the scenes for me to keep on generating posts.This post will let you walk into another part of my mind and reveal 5 challenges a chronically ill person may face when they decide to become a blogger…


5 Challenges of Blogging with a Chronic Illness

1. Blogging is Addicting

 I don’t know if blogging is addicting for everyone or if it just applies to me because of my addictive personality.  I use blogging as a natural remedy for my clinical depression so I try to do it as much as possible to release emotions.

The problem with this is, I have found is I end up not getting other important things done. For example,  I sit very confused looking at University briefs, because I can’t find a private tutor this year –  so I turn my mind to blogging instead.

blogging-for-business

If you find yourself in this position you need to like me – try and snap out of it and  make a loose time management schedule, so you can do everything.  As I move through the academic year I am aware that my blog is going to have to take a backseat if I am to pass it, not because I am abandoning you! I also have to admit the more I want to blog the more I shut myself away from my friends. However, I don’t want to give up blogging.  For once I am starting to enjoy one thing again, which in turn makes me feel less suicidal on the whole.


2. Limited Energy

With most chronic illness comes chronic pain, fatigue and brain fog which makes it difficult to concentrate.  I spend every spare second I have whether that be on the toilet or public transport thinking of new blog ideas and content. The issue associated with this is, my brain goes into overdrive – I  now don’t know how not to think.I am awake until the early hours of the morning. I can’t blame blogging entirely for this – I have always been known as a lady of the night up with pain. However, before my mind got a longer rest.

When my I-phone is ringing in my ear  I know the next day  has hit.  I then *sigh* reaching for the closest can of coca-cola to be able to manoeuvre up right and override the extreme tiredness for a short period of time.  Due to my levels of tiredness I get fed up very easily…

sleep

So, even if I have the best idea for a blog – I lack motivation  to actually blog as even the computer screen stares back at me like a fiend.  A part of this is attributed that with a chronic illness, you never know when bad patches will attack you.  This means it is also difficult to plan a content and schedule and actually STICK to it.


3. Anxiety and Negativity

 I can be a very negative person. To date, I will be honest I only have 66 followers.   I become anxious that no one will like or share my posts and that even sharing my reflections will be worthless.  I panic that the more I write the worse my academic writing for University will become and I am convinced I am going to fail there too.

The reason behind this is, blogging is very descriptive writing and University expects a much more critical standpoint for assessments.  I then wonder if I am being too ‘open’ with the public in what I am sharing and worry that it will affect future opportunities. For example – I need to pull my finger out my arse and start applying for 12 month placements for my degree.

anxiety

I frequently question, if having a blog will be a hindrance and shed light that I used drugs in my past, have clinical depression and that I am disabled. I don’t want special treatment but I know I need to disclose my disabilities on a job application form because my pain affects me on a day-to-day basis.  Whilst, this is all spinning around in my small brain,  I then worry about when I take a back seat from blogging –  if I can ever get the passion back because for other hobbies when I lost them, it was lost forever…


4. Being a Citizen of the Blogosphere

It is also no secret I struggle with Dyslexia and Dyspraxia. I find that when I read someone else’s blog to try and learn about other illnesses I don’t always understand what I am reading initially. Everything just gets lost in translation.

How do I overcome this?

I spend a lot of time on Google to understand what the illness is first and then go back to the individuals’ blog.  All of this is interesting but very time consuming.  You may be thinking – well just skip this part, but that would be a vital mistake.  Commenting on posts is essential to improve your writing skills and how you engage with other people.

dots


5. Gaining Traffic and Post Engagement

In October, I received just over 3,000 unique visitors. Although, I am not sure I really did receive this many as it is likely  some of these visitors were in fact me stalking myself using my friends’ phones as I was without one for a while.

I am unlucky with any electrical product! ( I  was definitely was born in the wrong century)..

th

Additionally, I don’t have a strong social media following across many platforms.  I spend the most time on the one where I do have a following – Facebook, to try to gain traffic for my blog.  I am also putting ‘all my eggs in one basket’ and hoping when I finally set up a YouTube channel this will improve my traffic and engagement… as I try to figure out how to increase my Twitter and  Pinterest following.

On Facebook I post my blog posts on my wall, into a couple blogging groups and into chronic illness support groups when I have permission to do so.

 


That Sprinkle of Advice 

4

Do you have a chronic illness and are thinking about becoming a blogger?

 DO IT!

Just remember don’t punish yourself for not being able to post as much as you would like to gain a following.  Fellow bloggers divulged that blogging consistently is very important, where I have fallen short a little bit as the times and days I post content really does vary. This is something I am going to work to improve as I become more experienced and I hope my readers understand that this is not always be possible.

On groups, ensure you always read the pinned posts in groups or you can find yourself getting an inbox of angry admin messages and deleted out of groups.  I find the most effective way to promote your blog on Facebook is through Facebook pages BUT be careful you will be blocked by Facebook if you are a repeat offender.

I think if you post a series on one theme, you may gain more followers. However, I don’t do this because my mind is scatty and like to think of lots of different topics at the same time!


So, guys there are the challenges I have faced blogging with a chronic illness. Next, you can expect to find 5 more general challenges I found since becoming a blogger and what I’ve learnt about myself since becoming a chronic illness blogger.


Sharing is Caring

I would love if you shared this post to raise awareness of some of the challenges a chronic illness blogger faces!


Have your Say

If you a blogger what are some challenges you face?

If you’re a chronic illness blogger do you face similar or different challenges to me?


 Like what you see? 

Join me on my journey on social media;

Facebook page

WordPress

Twitter 

Instagram

Pinterest

Thanks for staying tuned in bed with me and I hope to see you back soon.

Lots of Love,

my name

Popular Related Post

My Invisible Illness ft Tramadol